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Description
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
1/29/2013

Molina Healthcare of California and Inland Empire Health Plan engaged the stakeholder community in Riverside and San Bernardino counties to form the Inland Empire Coordinated Care Initiative (CCI) Advisory Committee. The purpose of the Committee is to provide a forum for structured input regarding how the plans develop, implement, and operate seamless access and coordination across the full continuum of services for dual eligible beneficiaries in the Inland Empire.

 

 

http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
36
Coordinated Care Initiative Status Update 1st Quarter 20131
  
11/24/2015

Please Join Us

 

September 26,Tuesday, 2017
1:30 pm to 4:30 pm

 

Molina Healthcare
550 E. Hospitality Lane
San Bernardino, CA 92408

 

Meeting Agenda and Materials - Click here

 

For call in Information or Reasonable Accommodation Requests
Please contact Danica Lusser: (888) 562-5442 Ext. 127628

http://authoring.inlandempirecci.org/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
19
Next IE CCI Advisory Committee Meeting2
  
7/23/2013

PDF icon  Click here to download PDF version

Inland Empire Coordinated Care Initiative (CCI) Advisory Committee

 

July 23, 2013

1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

 

Inland Regional Center

 1425 S. Waterman Ave.

San Bernardino, Ca 92408

 

Item

Presenter

Est. Time

 

       I.            Welcome and Introductions

·         Name

·         Agency

 

 

Ron Buttram

 

10 min.

    II.            Acceptance of minutes from May 21, 2013

Ron Buttram

 

5 min.

 

 III.            Review of the Action Log from May 21, 2013

 

Ron Buttram

10 min.

 IV.            Communication

 

Ron Buttram

60 min.

    V.            CCI/ Cal MediConnect Updates

 

Deborah Miller, Molina  and Roger Uminski, IEHP

 

20 min.

 VI.            Outreach Discussion Follow-Up

·         Sample Presentation

·         Brochure/ Handouts

Lisa Hayes, Molina and Ben Jauregui, IEHP

30 min.

VII.            Website

Lisa Hayes, Molina and Ben Jauregui, IEHP

20 min.

VIII.            Public Comment

Public

 

10 min.

 IX.            Next steps

Ron Buttram

 

5 min.

    X.            Closing comments

All

 

5 min.

 XI.            Next Meeting- TBD

 

5 min.

Handouts: 

·         Agenda

 

 

 

 

http://authoring.inlandempirecci.org/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
32
IE CCI Stakeholder Committee Agenda - 7.23.20133
  
8/14/2013

The SCAN Foundation invites the submission of proposals from eligible organizations that provide services in California’s eight Coordinated Care Initiative (CCI) counties, to participate in the second cohort of the Linkage Lab Academy. The passage of the CCI in California marked an important step toward transforming California's Medi-Cal delivery system to better serve the state’s low-income seniors and persons with disabilities. The CCI aims to improve care coordination for dual (Medicare and Medi-Cal) eligible beneficiaries and drive high quality care that helps people stay healthy and in their homes for as long as possible. Additionally, shifting services from institutional settings to the home and community will help create a person-centered health care system that is cost-effective. The goal of the Linkage Lab Academy is to build the business acumen of community-based organizations, thereby enabling them to enter into contractual relationships with the health care sector.

Read more.

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29
The Scan Foundation invites RFP submissions in CCI Counties9
  
7/19/2013
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to depict the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular heads of flowers. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Description
3 Mathematical model of floret arrangement
4 Genome
5 Cultivation and uses
6 Heliotropism misconception
7 History
8 Culture
9 Cultivars
10 Other species
11 See also
12 References
13 External links
 
Structure[edit]The root of a sunflower reflects its characteristic of being a dicot. Out of the seed, the first root, radicle, pushes through and develops into a taproot. It continues to expand through primary and secondary tissues. Primary roots develop from primary tissues of the apical meristems that increase the length of the plant. Secondary roots, from secondary tissues of the lateral meristems give rise to the girth of the plant. Both structures are vital for the growth and strength of the stem.
The stem of a sunflower grows from the plumule found inside the seed. The plumule is an embryo shoot with a hypocotyl stem structure below the point where the plumule was attached and an epicotyl stem structure above this attachment point.[1] Since a sunflower is a dicot, the cross-section of a stem organizes the vascular bundles in an away to separate the cortex and create a pith. This is opposite of its root structure which does not include a pith. The vascular bundles consisting of xylem and phloem transport water, mainly acquired from the roots, and food, mainly developed in the leaves, throughout the plant.
The leaf of a sunflower is considered a simple leaf, being one which consists of a single blade.[2] The plumule gives rise to the first leaves of the plant that will go on to grow into organs for transpiration, with the opening and closing of the stomata found within the cell structure of leaves; for photosynthesis, and for other metabolic activities.[3] As far as structure, a sunflower blade is heart-shaped, has pinnate venation, and alternates along the stem. Its green color accents the vibrant green or other variety of leaves the flower has.
The flower of a sunflower is actually several flowers, which is why it is considered an inflorescence. An inflorescence is a group of several flowers.[4] Therefore, the many individual packets at the center of the head are the fruits of the plant, not the seeds. Each flower of the sunflower consists of the typical structures of a flower: receptacle, peduncle, sepal, petals, stamen, and a pistil. Consequently, every flower is able to develop fruit, or the ripened ovary, with the ovule (seed) inside.
 
http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
33
Announcements10 Announcements10 Announcements10 Announcements10 10
  
7/17/2013
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to depict the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular heads of flowers. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Description
3 Mathematical model of floret arrangement
4 Genome
5 Cultivation and uses
6 Heliotropism misconception
7 History
8 Culture
9 Cultivars
10 Other species
11 See also
12 References
13 External links
 
Structure[edit]The root of a sunflower reflects its characteristic of being a dicot. Out of the seed, the first root, radicle, pushes through and develops into a taproot. It continues to expand through primary and secondary tissues. Primary roots develop from primary tissues of the apical meristems that increase the length of the plant. Secondary roots, from secondary tissues of the lateral meristems give rise to the girth of the plant. Both structures are vital for the growth and strength of the stem.
The stem of a sunflower grows from the plumule found inside the seed. The plumule is an embryo shoot with a hypocotyl stem structure below the point where the plumule was attached and an epicotyl stem structure above this attachment point.[1] Since a sunflower is a dicot, the cross-section of a stem organizes the vascular bundles in an away to separate the cortex and create a pith. This is opposite of its root structure which does not include a pith. The vascular bundles consisting of xylem and phloem transport water, mainly acquired from the roots, and food, mainly developed in the leaves, throughout the plant.
The leaf of a sunflower is considered a simple leaf, being one which consists of a single blade.[2] The plumule gives rise to the first leaves of the plant that will go on to grow into organs for transpiration, with the opening and closing of the stomata found within the cell structure of leaves; for photosynthesis, and for other metabolic activities.[3] As far as structure, a sunflower blade is heart-shaped, has pinnate venation, and alternates along the stem. Its green color accents the vibrant green or other variety of leaves the flower has.
The flower of a sunflower is actually several flowers, which is why it is considered an inflorescence. An inflorescence is a group of several flowers.[4] Therefore, the many individual packets at the center of the head are the fruits of the plant, not the seeds. Each flower of the sunflower consists of the typical structures of a flower: receptacle, peduncle, sepal, petals, stamen, and a pistil. Consequently, every flower is able to develop fruit, or the ripened ovary, with the ovule (seed) inside.
 
http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
35
Announcements11 Announcements11 Announcements11 Announcements11 11
  
7/25/2013
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to depict the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular heads of flowers. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Description
3 Mathematical model of floret arrangement
4 Genome
5 Cultivation and uses
6 Heliotropism misconception
7 History
8 Culture
9 Cultivars
10 Other species
11 See also
12 References
13 External links
 
Structure[edit]The root of a sunflower reflects its characteristic of being a dicot. Out of the seed, the first root, radicle, pushes through and develops into a taproot. It continues to expand through primary and secondary tissues. Primary roots develop from primary tissues of the apical meristems that increase the length of the plant. Secondary roots, from secondary tissues of the lateral meristems give rise to the girth of the plant. Both structures are vital for the growth and strength of the stem.
The stem of a sunflower grows from the plumule found inside the seed. The plumule is an embryo shoot with a hypocotyl stem structure below the point where the plumule was attached and an epicotyl stem structure above this attachment point.[1] Since a sunflower is a dicot, the cross-section of a stem organizes the vascular bundles in an away to separate the cortex and create a pith. This is opposite of its root structure which does not include a pith. The vascular bundles consisting of xylem and phloem transport water, mainly acquired from the roots, and food, mainly developed in the leaves, throughout the plant.
The leaf of a sunflower is considered a simple leaf, being one which consists of a single blade.[2] The plumule gives rise to the first leaves of the plant that will go on to grow into organs for transpiration, with the opening and closing of the stomata found within the cell structure of leaves; for photosynthesis, and for other metabolic activities.[3] As far as structure, a sunflower blade is heart-shaped, has pinnate venation, and alternates along the stem. Its green color accents the vibrant green or other variety of leaves the flower has.
The flower of a sunflower is actually several flowers, which is why it is considered an inflorescence. An inflorescence is a group of several flowers.[4] Therefore, the many individual packets at the center of the head are the fruits of the plant, not the seeds. Each flower of the sunflower consists of the typical structures of a flower: receptacle, peduncle, sepal, petals, stamen, and a pistil. Consequently, every flower is able to develop fruit, or the ripened ovary, with the ovule (seed) inside.
 
http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
2
Announcements12 Announcements12 Announcements12 Announcements12 12
  
7/24/2013
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to depict the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular heads of flowers. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Description
3 Mathematical model of floret arrangement
4 Genome
5 Cultivation and uses
6 Heliotropism misconception
7 History
8 Culture
9 Cultivars
10 Other species
11 See also
12 References
13 External links
 
Structure[edit]The root of a sunflower reflects its characteristic of being a dicot. Out of the seed, the first root, radicle, pushes through and develops into a taproot. It continues to expand through primary and secondary tissues. Primary roots develop from primary tissues of the apical meristems that increase the length of the plant. Secondary roots, from secondary tissues of the lateral meristems give rise to the girth of the plant. Both structures are vital for the growth and strength of the stem.
The stem of a sunflower grows from the plumule found inside the seed. The plumule is an embryo shoot with a hypocotyl stem structure below the point where the plumule was attached and an epicotyl stem structure above this attachment point.[1] Since a sunflower is a dicot, the cross-section of a stem organizes the vascular bundles in an away to separate the cortex and create a pith. This is opposite of its root structure which does not include a pith. The vascular bundles consisting of xylem and phloem transport water, mainly acquired from the roots, and food, mainly developed in the leaves, throughout the plant.
The leaf of a sunflower is considered a simple leaf, being one which consists of a single blade.[2] The plumule gives rise to the first leaves of the plant that will go on to grow into organs for transpiration, with the opening and closing of the stomata found within the cell structure of leaves; for photosynthesis, and for other metabolic activities.[3] As far as structure, a sunflower blade is heart-shaped, has pinnate venation, and alternates along the stem. Its green color accents the vibrant green or other variety of leaves the flower has.
The flower of a sunflower is actually several flowers, which is why it is considered an inflorescence. An inflorescence is a group of several flowers.[4] Therefore, the many individual packets at the center of the head are the fruits of the plant, not the seeds. Each flower of the sunflower consists of the typical structures of a flower: receptacle, peduncle, sepal, petals, stamen, and a pistil. Consequently, every flower is able to develop fruit, or the ripened ovary, with the ovule (seed) inside.
 
http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
31
Announcements13 Announcements13 Announcements13 Announcements13 13
  
7/18/2013
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to depict the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves and circular heads of flowers. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.
Contents [hide]
1 Structure
2 Description
3 Mathematical model of floret arrangement
4 Genome
5 Cultivation and uses
6 Heliotropism misconception
7 History
8 Culture
9 Cultivars
10 Other species
11 See also
12 References
13 External links
 
Structure[edit]The root of a sunflower reflects its characteristic of being a dicot. Out of the seed, the first root, radicle, pushes through and develops into a taproot. It continues to expand through primary and secondary tissues. Primary roots develop from primary tissues of the apical meristems that increase the length of the plant. Secondary roots, from secondary tissues of the lateral meristems give rise to the girth of the plant. Both structures are vital for the growth and strength of the stem.
The stem of a sunflower grows from the plumule found inside the seed. The plumule is an embryo shoot with a hypocotyl stem structure below the point where the plumule was attached and an epicotyl stem structure above this attachment point.[1] Since a sunflower is a dicot, the cross-section of a stem organizes the vascular bundles in an away to separate the cortex and create a pith. This is opposite of its root structure which does not include a pith. The vascular bundles consisting of xylem and phloem transport water, mainly acquired from the roots, and food, mainly developed in the leaves, throughout the plant.
The leaf of a sunflower is considered a simple leaf, being one which consists of a single blade.[2] The plumule gives rise to the first leaves of the plant that will go on to grow into organs for transpiration, with the opening and closing of the stomata found within the cell structure of leaves; for photosynthesis, and for other metabolic activities.[3] As far as structure, a sunflower blade is heart-shaped, has pinnate venation, and alternates along the stem. Its green color accents the vibrant green or other variety of leaves the flower has.
The flower of a sunflower is actually several flowers, which is why it is considered an inflorescence. An inflorescence is a group of several flowers.[4] Therefore, the many individual packets at the center of the head are the fruits of the plant, not the seeds. Each flower of the sunflower consists of the typical structures of a flower: receptacle, peduncle, sepal, petals, stamen, and a pistil. Consequently, every flower is able to develop fruit, or the ripened ovary, with the ovule (seed) inside.
 
http://calbmossdv03:8686/sites/InlandEmpireCCI/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
34
Announcements14 Announcements14 Announcements14 Announcements14 Announcements14 14
  
8/14/2013

The Department of Health Care Services(DHCS) announced today that enrollment for the Cal MediConnect program (Medicare and Medi-Cal or 'dual-eligible' or Medi-Medi's) will begin no sooner than April 2014.

 

 

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30
DHCS Announces New date for CCI: No sooner than April 1, 2014 15
  
9/24/2013

PDF icon  Click here to download PDF version

 

 Inland Empire Coordinated Care Initiative (CCI) Advisory Committee

September 24, 2013

1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Inland Regional Center

1425 S. Waterman Ave.

San Bernardino, Ca 92408


 

 

Item

 

Presenter

 

Est. Time

 

I. Welcome and Introductions

• Name

• Agency

 

 

Ron Buttram

 

10 min.

 

II. Acceptance of minutes from May 21, 2013

 

Ron Buttram

5 min.

 

III. Review of the Action Log from May 21, 2013

 

Ron Buttram

10 min.

 

IV. Risks

• How to mitigate the identified risks

 

 

60 min.

 

V. CCI/ Cal MediConnect Updates

• Rates

• Plan Benefit Design

• MOU’s

 

Deborah Miller, Molina and Roger Uminski, IEHP

20 min.

 

VI. Communication Updates

 

Ron Buttram

50 min.

 

VII. Public Comment

 

Public

10 min.

 

VIII. Next steps

 

Ron Buttram

5 min.

 

IX. Closing comments

 

All

5 min.

 

X. Next Meeting- November 26, 2013 from1:30-4:30

 

Inland Regional Center

1425 S. Waterman Ave.

San Bernardino, Ca 92408

Ron Buttram

5 min.

Handouts:

• Agenda

• Minutes

 

 

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28
IE CCI Stakeholder Committee Agenda - 9.24.201416
  
10/3/2013http://authoring.inlandempirecci.org/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
27
The CCI:  Advanced Training I - Consumer Protections and Benefit Package Summary17
  
1/28/2014

 

Coordinated Care Initiative Update

 

Dear Lisa,

 

Today, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the results of a program audit of CalOptima's dual eligible special needs plan product.  As a consequence of this audit, Cal MediConnect in Orange County will not move forward until CalOptima has taken the immediate corrective actions required by Medicare.

 

We are concerned about the results of this audit, and deeply concerned about its implications for beneficiaries in Orange County.  In fact, DHCS and the Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC) intend to conduct an audit of the Medi-Cal operations at CalOptima. Once the results of DHCS' audit are reviewed, a decision will be made about the status of managed Medi-Cal long-term services and supports (MLTSS) in Orange County. DHCS will work closely with all of our partners to ensure that all CalOptima beneficiaries receive high quality care and full consumer protections. 

 

The CMS announcement today shows that the CCI readiness review process is working.   All health plans participating in the CCI are subject to a number of reviews and audits - CMS audits, Department of Health Care Services and Department of Managed Health Care oversight and plan readiness review. 

 

More information about the CalOptima program audit and the full CMS report will be posted at 

http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Compliance-and-Audits/Part-C-and-Part-D-Compliance-and-Audits/Program-Audit-Results.html.

 

We will continue to keep you informed as this process moves forward, and welcome your questions.

 

  

Sincerely,

 

Jane Ogle
Deputy Director, Health Care Delivery Systems
Department of Health Care Services

 

Get all important updates at www.CalDuals.org

 

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25
CCI Stakeholder Update from Jane Ogle18
  
1/28/2014
PDF icon  Click here to download PDF version

 


Cal MediConnect Ombudsman Program Update from

Jane Ogle
Deputy Director, Health Care Delivery Systems
Department of Health Care Services


On January 13, 2014, the Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC) released the Cal MediConnect Ombudsman Program Request for Proposals (RFP). The RFP can be accessed
here (http://www.dmhc.ca.gov/library/reports/news/RFP13MCSA010.pdf). 

The deadline to submit a proposal is January 28, 2014 at 4pm PT.

DMHC will be hosting an optional Proposer's Conference on January 22, 2014 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm PT. There will be an in-person option & a call-in option.

In-person option:

Department of Managed Health Care

980 9th Street, Suite 500

Sacramento, CA 95814

 

Call-in option: Instructions on how to join via conference call will be posted at the DMHC website a minimum of 5 days prior to the Proposer's Conference.

 

If you have questions related to the RFP, please contact teresa.johnson@dmhc.ca.gov

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25
The Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC) releases Cal MediConnect Ombudsman Program RFP! 19
  
2/7/2014

State health officials yesterday announced several changes to the April 1 launch of the duals demonstration project in California.

Read more

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24
State Alters Rollout of Duals Project20
  
3/6/2014

 

PDF icon Click here to download PDF

 


WHEN:

March 6, 2014 - Thursday

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM (Includes light lunch)

 

WHERE:

 

 

 

Norman F. Feldheym Central Library*

Kellogg B Conference Room

555 W. 6th St

San Bernardino, CA 92410

*Part of the San Bernardino Public Library System

 

WHO:

 

 

 

Frontline practitioners, service providers and beneficiaries

 

WHY:

Medicare and Medi-Cal beneficiaries in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, as well as 6 other

California counties will soon have a new health care option called Cal MediConnect, which combines the benefits of both programs into one managed care plan.

 

 

• Who qualifies?

• How and when do you enroll?

• How will this new option dramatically improve healthcare for low-income elders and disabled people?

 

PARKING:

Ample all-day parking spots available inside library’s parking lot. Within this lot, 4 spots available total

for persons with disability — 2 each on F St., and also on E St.

Please be cautious of marked 2-hour parking spots [rows] on these streets also as enforcement

is very strict.

 

Please RSVP to:

Odette Keeley – 650.455.3063 - okeeley@newamericamedia.org

Semany Gashaw – 415.503.4170 – sgashaw@newamericamedia.org

 

 

 

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23
New American Media Event for the Inland Empire21
  
9/26/2017
test
/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
10
CCI CALENDAR OF EVENTS & TRAINING 22
  
1/15/2015

New Cal Mediconnect Toons Click Here.

http://www.calduals.org/cal-mediconnectoons/CLICK HERENo
22
New Cal Mediconnect Toons 23
  
2/26/2015
Do you...
    have questions about Cal MediConnect?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    need to know more about your health plan choices?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    or know someone else who does?

Join us for the Inland Empire's Cal MediConnect
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Telephone Town Hall Meeting
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, February 26, 2015
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6:00pm - 7:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Call toll Free: 1-888-400-1932
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 

View the event flyers below for more details:
Town Hall Flyer (English) 
Town Hall Flyer (Spanish)​

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
​​​​​​​
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21
Cal MediConnect Telephone Town Hall Meeting24
  
6/23/2015CMC SumitCLICK HERENo
20
Cal MediConnect Providers Summit 25
  
5/29/2018

Please Join Us

 

Tuesday, May 29, 2018
1:30 pm to 4:30 pm

 

Molina Healthcare
550 E. Hospitality Lane
San Bernardino, CA 92408

 

Meeting Agenda and Materials - Click here

http://authoring.inlandempirecci.org/Pages/NewsContent.aspxCLICK HERENo
6
Next IE CCI Advisory Committee Meeting26
  
12/8/2016http://author.inlandempirecci.org/PDF/IE-CCI-Communications-Workgroup.pdfCLICK HERENo
18
Join the Communications Workgroup27
  
7/25/2017

Health Plan Basics ~ IEHP

/PDF/health-plan-basics-IEHP.pdfCLICK HERE No
17
Health  Plan Basics ~ IEHP28
  
9/20/2017

​CCI Webinar Flier for IE Providers​

/PDF/CCI-Webinar-Flier-IE-Advocates-September-19-2017.pdfCLICK HERENo
11
CCI Webinar Flier for IE Providers29
  
9/19/2017

​CCI Webinar Flier IE Advocates​

/PDF/CCI-Webinar-Flier-IE-Advocates-September-19-2017.pdfCLICK HERENo
12
CCI Webinar Flier IE Advocates30
  
8/22/2017

​CCI Webinar Flier IE Advocates​

/PDF/CCI-Webinar-Flier-IE-Advocates-August-22-2017.pdfCLICK HERENo
13
CCI Webinar Flier IE Advocates31
  
8/16/2017

​CCI Webinar Flier IE Providers​

/PDF/CCI-Webinar-Flier-IE-Providers-August-16-2017.pdfCLICK HERENo
14
CCI Webinar Flier IE Providers32
  
8/2/2017

About Our Outreach - Spanish​

/PDF/About-Our-Outreach-SPAN-08-02-17.pdfCLICK HERENo
16
About Our Outreach Spanish33
  
8/2/2017

​About Our Outreach - English​

/PDF/About-Our-Outreach-ENG-8-2-17.pdfCLICK HERENo
15
About Our Outreach - English34
  
3/24/2018
test
/PDF/iedc-expo-2018.pdfCLICK HERENo
9
CCI CALENDAR OF EVENTS & TRAINING 35
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